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Home > Contributor Biographies > Meziane Lasfer

Contributor Biographies

Meziane Lasfer

Professor, Cass Business School, UK
Meziane LasferMeziane Lasfer

Meziane Lasfer is professor of finance at Cass Business School, London, which he joined in 1990. He has written extensively on corporate finance, capital markets, and corporate governance issues. His research is widely reported in the financial press and is published in top academic journals such as the Journal of Finance, the Journal of Finance and Quantitative Analysis, the Journal of Banking and Finance, the Journal of Corporate Finance, the Journal of Business Finance and Accounting, Financial Management, the National Tax Journal, and European Financial Management. He is a visiting professor at University Paris-Dauphine. He teaches extensively masters, PhDs, and executives at Cass and abroad.


Articles by this Author

  • Acquiring a Secondary Listing, or Cross-Listing
    by Meziane Lasfer
    Cross-listing is controversial and raises a number of academic and practitioner questions, particularly: Why and how does a firm cross-list, and does cross-listing create additional value for existing stockholders? The purpose of this article is to discuss the institutional framework of cross-listing, the classification of depository receipts (DRs), the types of DR available in the United States, the reasons why companies list abroad (by...
  • Optimizing the Capital Structure: Finding the Right Balance between Debt and Equity
    by Meziane Lasfer
    There are three financing methods that companies can use: debt, equity, and hybrid securities. This categorization is based on the main characteristics of the securities.Debt FinancingDebt financing ranges from simple bank debt to commercial paper and corporate bonds. It is a contractual arrangement between a company and an investor, whereby the company pays a predetermined claim (or interest) that is not a function of its operating performance,...

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