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Home > Contributor Biographies > R. Brayton Bowen

Contributor Biographies

R. Brayton Bowen

Executive Adviser, McKendree University, USA
R. Brayton BowenR. Brayton Bowen

R. Brayton Bowen is author of Recognizing and Rewarding Employees (McGraw-Hill) and leads the Howland Group, a strategy consulting and change management firm committed to “building better worlds of work.” His documentary series Anger in the Workplace, distributed to public radio nationally in the United States, continues to be regarded as a benchmark study on the subject of workplace issues and change. A Best Practice editor and contributing author to the hallmark work Business: The Ultimate Resource (Bloomsbury Publishing and Perseus Books), he has written for MWorld, the online magazine of the American Management Association. He currently serves as executive adviser for the Center for Business Excellence at McKendree University.


Articles by this Author

  • Cultural Alignment and Risk Management: Developing the Right Culture
    by R. Brayton Bowen
    The goal was to beat Microsoft at its own game. After rebuffing a takeover attempt by the giant corporation, Novell Nouveau went on an acquisition binge of its own. The strategy was to acquire a premier word-processing company that could rival Microsoft, and Microsoft’s “Microsoft Word” in particular. So, in 1994, Raymond Noorda, CEO for the then second-largest software company, acquired WordPerfect Corp. for US$1.4 billion in stock. Novell was...
  • Aligning Structure with Strategy: Recalibrating for Improved Performance and Increased Profitability
    by R. Brayton Bowen
    Phlebotomy—the ancient practice of bloodletting—seemed logical when medical science centered on the belief that four humors made up the human body: yellow bile, black bile, phlegm, and blood. It was thought at the time that an ailing person could be brought to good health by vomiting, purging, starving, and bloodletting. Unfortunately, in the latter instance, any number of the sick bled to death! By today’s medical standards, the practice is...

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