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Contributor Biographies

Terry Carroll

Formerly Head of Corporate Finance (retired), Broadhead Peel Rhodes, UK
Terry CarrollTerry Carroll

Terry Carroll headed up corporate finance and advisory services for Broadhead Peel Rhodes, following a highly successful career as finance director and CEO of a range of businesses. He was also for some years a business and financial consultant, working especially with SMEs and growing businesses. A qualified banker, corporate treasurer, and chartered accountant who trained with KPMG, Carroll has experience of many different corporate finance projects, including banking, financing, business restructuring, mergers and acquisitions, MBO/MBI, and venture and private capital. With five books and scores of published articles, he is also an established business author.


Articles by this Author

  • A Holistic Approach to Business Risk Management
    by Terry Carroll
    After arguably the greatest credit crisis in history, it is unsurprising that lenders, borrowers, and investors alike have become preoccupied with financial risk. Its magnitude seems to have dwarfed all other business risk considerations. It can be hard to take a pragmatic view when the strictures in the financial markets may have put the corporation at risk, but the correct perspective is for all risk to be captured in a holistic...
  • A Total Balance Sheet Approach to Financial Risk
    by Terry Carroll
    We are living in some of the most volatile times in the history of the global financial markets. One of the reasons is exactly because they have become truly global. As banks seek to restore profitability, they may increase their offering of “treasury products” to customers. This article argues that these should be considered only in the context of a total balance sheet approach rather than transaction by transaction.
  • Managing 21st Century Finances
    by Terry Carroll
    Corporate purpose, for most companies, is to create and sustain long-term stockholder value. However, markets can be driven by fear or euphoria. Stuck in the middle are top managers, especially the CFOs. They have to balance long-term planning with “short-termist” behavior in the markets. How can this be achieved? What are the new metrics for survival and sustainable prosperity?As some companies have destroyed value, some have begun to question...
  • Why the “Credit Crunch” May Be Good for Corporate Governance
    by Terry Carroll
    In her article “A board culture of corporate governance,” Gabrielle O’Donovan defines corporate governance as “an internal system encompassing policies, processes and people, which serves the needs of shareholders and other stakeholders, by directing and controlling management activities with good business savvy, objectivity and integrity.”In the United Kingdom the corporate governance industry was probably born in 1992 with the Cadbury Report....
  • Identifying the Right Nonexecutive Director
    by Terry Carroll
    The “Credit Crunch” has thrown up many challenges and controversies. The extraordinary losses at Société Générale were reminiscent of the Barings debacle. The unaccountable losses suffered by many banks, especially in America, also beg serious questions about nonexecutive directors (NEDs). Never have times been tougher, or the challenges greater—and not just for banks but for all companies. Never has there been a clearer need for the right...
  • Corporate Finance for SMEs
    by Terry Carroll
    The term “corporate finance” is widely, and sometimes loosely, used in business. In accounting firms it typically relates to a department or function that primarily deals with:mergers, acquisitions, and disposals (M&A); raising finance (early stage through to mature businesses); flotations; management buyouts and buy-ins; business valuations; due diligence; succession planning and exit strategies. These might represent the practical application...

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